CITAMS@ASA

ASA 2018 Philadelphia

Dave & Buster's Sunday, August 12 @ 6pm 325 N Christopher Columbus Blvd Philadelphia, PA 19106 just 1.5 miles from the conference headquarters

Section on Communication, Information Technologies, and Media Sociology 2018

https://convention2.allacademic.com/one/asa/asa18/

First, we’re ready for Philadelphia! ASA has published the program for the 2018 Annual Meeting Program here. As a sign of the continued growth of our networked transfield, CITAMS and its members have a strong presence at the ASA 2018.  We have our 2 section sessions, 10 section roundtables, 3 sessions of Internet and Society, 2 sessions on Media Sociology, and many more sessions related to communication, information technologies, and media sociologies.

2 section sessions

2123 – Media and Power

Sun, August 12, 8:30 to 10:10am, Pennsylvania Convention Center, Level 100, 113B

Session Submission Type: Paper Session 100min

Description: CITAMS session on Communication, Information Technologies, and Media Sociology section of the American Sociological Association welcomes papers that focus on any aspect of power and media writ large. Papers may examine any form of power and/or power inequalities in any form of media. Each paper presented at this session is also invited to be considered in the yearly CITAMS special issue of the Journal of Information, Communication and Society.

Session Organizer: Laura Robinson, Santa Clara University

Individual Presentations

2411 – CITAMS@30: Perspectives, Purposes and Promises

Sun, August 12, 2:30 to 4:10pm, Pennsylvania Convention Center, Level 100, 105AB

Session Submission Type: Paper Session 100min

Description: Celebrating the 30th anniversary of the section, the Communication, Information Technologies, and Media Sociology section of the American Sociological Association (CITAMS) welcomes papers on the history, present and future of Communication, Information Technologies, and Media Sociology, its place and role in sociology, the academe and the society. Each paper presented at this session is also invited to be considered in the yearly CITAMS special issue of the Journal of Information, Communication and Society.

Session Organizer:  Wenhong Chen, University of Texas-Austin

Individual Presentations

10 section roundtables

Section on Communication, Information Technologies and Media Sociology Refereed Roundtables (one-hour).

https://convention2.allacademic.com/one/asa/asa18/index.php?cmd=Online+Program+View+Event&selected_box_id=269045&PHPSESSID=v2d1ol94p4c12sk2ba4rllrtr5

 The CITAMS roundtable sessions are open to any paper falling under the topics present in our section’s name: Communication, Information Technologies, and Media Sociology section of the American Sociological Association (CITAMS) Thematically similar papers are grouped together into an average of 10-12 groups after submissions are closed. At the table, presenters are invited to discuss their research with authors who share similarly themed submissions. Generally, each presenter is given 5-10 minutes to give an overview of their work to the other CITAMS members sitting at the table with them. Discussion about the table’s corpus of knowledge is pursued until the end of the session. The goal of these roundtables is to foster community among the CITAMS members as well as offering an opportunity for previously disconnected researchers to meet each other. Previous table themes include: Media Sociology and Social Movements, Games and Play through Media and Communication Technology, Inequality and Communication; Communication Technology and Organizations; Communication and Social Construction, Representations and Resistance, Collective Meaning, Media Sociology and Issues of Access, and nearly every other configuration of media sociology and communication technologies can consider. Each paper presented at the roundtable is also invited to be considered for the yearly CITAMS special issue of the Journal of Information Communication and Society. Session Organizer: Sarah Sobieraj, Tufts University

*Session will be 1-hour in length; followed by the Section’s 40-minute business meeting.

3 sessions of Internet and Society

1152 – Internet and Society: Feeling Digital

Sat, August 11, 8:30 to 10:10am, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Level 4, 407

Session Submission Type: Paper Session 100min

Description: The papers in this session explore the various concerns of digital platforms on the Internet and the effects on society.

Session Organizer: Wenhong Chen, University of Texas at Austin

Individual Presentations

1466 – Internet and Society: Across the Life Course

Sat, August 11, 2:30 to 4:10pm, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Level 4, Franklin Hall 2

Session Submission Type: Paper Session 100min

Description: The papers in this session explore how the Internet affects societal behavior through various facets including bias, education, health, and more.

Session Organizer: Wenhong Chen, University of Texas at Austin

Individual Presentations

3257 – Internet and Society: Civic, Political, and Organizational

Mon, August 13, 10:30am to 12:10pm, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Level 4, 412

Session Submission Type: Paper Session 100min

Description: The papers in this session examine the influence of Internet and society in shaping civic, political, and organizational outcomes.

Session Organizer: Wenhong Chen, University of Texas-Austin

Individual Presentations

Discussant: Julie B. Wiest, West Chester University of Pennsylvania

2 sessions on Media Sociology

1277 – Media Sociology II: Media Supported Action

Sat, August 11, 10:30am to 12:10pm, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Level 4, Franklin Hall 13

Session Submission Type: Paper Session 100min

Description:  New technologies make activism easier for people who don’t have to leave the comfort of their homes to “like” a politically-charged article or sign a petition. In this session, scholars present their emerging work on how different forms of media allows for particular activism, as well as the shortfalls of this sort of participation. Topics include: digital online action, kids’ political engagement, the American Indian farm movement, and information effects on disaster resilience.

Session Organizer: Kristen Barber, Southern Illinois University-Carbondale

Presider: William D. Hoynes, Vassar College

Individual Presentations

Discussant: Selina R. Gallo-Cruz, College of the Holy Cross

3258 – Media Sociology I: Politics and the News

Mon, August 13, 10:30am to 12:10pm, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Level 4, 413

Session Submission Type: Paper Session 100min

Description: The news has become an increasingly contested site of political division. This is especially true as the Trump administration’s attack on mainstream journalism pushes the relationship between nationalism and political narratives of “alternative facts.” In this session, presenters discuss their emerging research on: “fake news,” the media’s role in democratization, online extremism, and the future of media power.

Session Organizer: Kristen Barber, Southern Illinois University-Carbondale

Presider: Vaughn Schmutz, University of North Carolina-Charlotte

Individual Presentations

Discussant: Kelsy Kretschmer, Oregon State University

Business Meeting

2207 – Section on Communication, Information Technologies, and Media Sociology Business Meeting

Sun, August 12, 11:30am to 12:10pm, Pennsylvania Convention Center, Level 100, 103B

Session Submission Type: Business Meeting

Description: The Communication, Information Technologies, and Media Sociology Business Meeting is an opportunity for members to raise issues, express opinions, and discuss important topics in regards to Communication, Information Technologies, and Media Sociology. All interested members are encouraged to attend and share their insights, reactions, opinions, and suggestions.

Session Organizer: Wenhong Chen, University of Texas at Austin

Section Reception : CITAMS@30

Dave & Buster’s, Sunday, August 12 @ 6pm, 325 N Christopher Columbus Blvd, Philadelphia, PA 19106, which is just 1.5 miles away from the conference headquarters.

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1_Pih6tI2kdCIiD970kusVQnt8-AoS_BkC7Rx-MO82Z0/edit#slide=id.p

This year’s CITAMS reception will be held at Dave & Buster’s on Philly’s Delaware River Waterfront. We have reserved the picturesque Bridgeside Patyroom, offering a stunning view of the the Benjamin Franklin Bridge. Hor d’oeuvres for all! A free drink and game card for the first 75 in attendance!
Join us for fun, games, friends and sociology (as if they are not all the same thing)!

ASA 2017 Montreal


Overview:

August 11th

Media Sociology Preconference at Concordia University

August 12 CITAMS Day at ASA

Council Meeting: 7am-8:15am, Palais des congrès de Montréal, Level 5, 517B, Breakfast served.

CITAMS Refereed Roundtables: 8:30-9:30am: Palais des congrès de Montréal, 517B

CITAMS Business Meeting: 9:30-10:10am: Palais des congrès de Montréal, 517B
Awards, Light Breakfast

CITAMS Session. Race, Social Movements and Digital Media Technologies: 10:30am-12:10pm: Palais des congrès de Montréal, 513C

CITAMS Session. Culture, Inequality and Social Inclusion in the Digital Era: 2:30-4:10pm: Palais des congrès de Montréal, 513B

Regular Session: Internet and Society: Identity, Connectivity, and Integration: 2:30-4:10pm: Palais des congrès de Montréal, 510C

CITAMS Reception 6:00-8:00pm, Vargas Steakhouse & Sushi, 690 René-Lévesque Blvd W, Montreal, QC H3B 1X8, Canada (NOTE: this is NOT the location listed in the program. Disregard that & come join us here! FURTHER: Be not afraid of the name of this establishment, as there will be plenty of vegan & vegetarian options. Cash bar.)

August 13th

Thematic Session: How Technology is Changing Social Relationships: 8:30-10:10am: Palais des congrès de Montréal, 511C

Regular Session. Gender, Ethnicity, and Racialization in the Media: 8:30-10:10am:Palais des congrès de Montréal, 512E

Special Session. Culture(s) of Privacy and Surveillance in World of Technological and Legal Change: 12:30-2:10pm: Palais des congrès de Montréal, 515B,

Soon-to-be-Author-Meets-Non-Critics. “Superconnected: The Internet, Digital Media, and Techno-Social Life.” Mary Chayko, Rutgers University: 9:00-11:00pm: Palais des congrès de Montréal, 514A

August 14th

Policy and Research Workshop. Engage! How to Win Over the Media, Promote Your Research and Become a Front Page Personality: 8:30-10:10am: Palais des congrès de Montréal, 510D

Section on Sociology of Culture. Gender, Culture, Media: 8:30-10:10am: Palais des congrès de Montréal, 513C

Regular Session. Internet and Society: Identity, Connectivity, and Integration: 2:30-4:10pm: Palais des congrès de Montréal, 510C

Section on Sociology of Culture. The Mediation of Cultural Conflict: 2:30-4:10pm: Palais des congrès de Montréal, 514B

Regular Session. Internet and Society: The Rogue Ones: 4:30-6:10pm: Palais des congrès de Montréal, 510C

August 15th

Regular Session. Social and Digital Media: 8:30-10:10am: Palais des congrès de Montréal, 516A

Thematic Session. How Media Shape Group Boundaries: 12:30-2:10pm:Palais des congrès de Montréal, 511D


 

Detailed Day-by-Day Information: ASA 2017

August 12 CITAMS Day

Section on Communication, Information Technologies, and Media Sociology Refereed Roundtable Sessions Palais des congrès de Montréal, 517B, 8:30-9:30am

Session Organizer: Mary Chayko, Rutgers University

Table 01. The 2016 U.S. Presidential Election: Political Communication, Discourse, and Debate

Politics beyond Ocean: The Ideological Turn in China’s Knowledge Sharing Media. Linzhuo Li, University of Chicago

The public sphere vs. Breitbart: Mediated political gaffe construction from Trent Lott to Donald Trump. Ian Sheinheit, University at Albany SUNY

Table 02. Community and Identity in Social Networks

Presider: Anabel Quan-Haase, University of Western Ontario

Can Users of Social Media Produce Enduring Social Ties? David G. Ortiz, New Mexico State University

Managing the Culture Shock: Black Identity in a Pwi and the Role of Online Interactions. David A. Martin, University of Oregon

Emerging and Diverging SNS Use: The Importance of Social Network Sites for Older Emerging Adults. Brian J. Miller, Wheaton College; Peter John Mundey, Calvin College

Can I See More of You? Afropolitan Self-stylization on Grindr Profiles in Soweto. Nicholas Andrew Boston, City University of New York-Lehman College

Table 03. Contemporary Issues in Journalism and Media Sociology: From Addiction to Advertising

Presider: Stephen R. Barnard, St. Lawrence University

A Comparative Study on the Media Coverage of Internet Addiction in South Korea and the United States. Arum Park, Princeton University

Content Nausea: The Blurry Boundaries Between Native Advertisements and News Stories. Maxwell Lindquist, Independent Scholar

Newsroom Workers’ Job Satisfaction Contingent on Position and Adaptation to Digital Disruption. Brock Ternes, State University of New York-Cortland; Laveda J. Peterlin, University of Kansas; Scott Reinardy, University of Kansas

Table 04. Bridging Divides: Technological Access, Skills and Equality

Digital Inequalities and Cyber-Security Behaviors: Digital Skills as the Main Determinant of Antivirus Use. Matias Dodel, Universidad Catolica del Uruguay; Gustavo S. Mesch, University of Haifa

Online Opportunities and Risks for Children and Adolescents: An Integrated Model for the Case of Brazil. Tania Cabello-Hutt, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill; Patricio Cabello, School of Journalism, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso; Magdalena Claro, Center for the Study of Educational Policy and Practice (CEPPE), Faculty of Education, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile.

Using ICTs for Gender Inclusion and Sustainable Development in sub-Saharan Africa. Christobel Asiedu, Louisiana Tech University

Who is the “Information have-nots” in Smart Society? An Exploratory Study of Categorizing the Elderly. Joohyun Oh, Yonsei University

Table 05. Games and their Consequences

Presider: Deborah Jean Burris-Kitchen, Tennessee State University

No More Games: An Intersectional Approach to Geek Masculinity and Marginalization in Video Games. Anna Cameron, University of Virginia

Mapping Inspiration in Online Communities of Play. Pierson Avery Browne, University of Waterloo

Who Plays Fantasy Sports and Why? Understanding the Community Dynamics of Season-long Fantasy Sports Participation. Samantha Nicole Jaroszewski, Princeton University

Roger Ebert Versus Video Games: The Important Role Social Narratives Play in Artistic Legitimation. Brian McKernan, The Sage Colleges

Table 06. Music, Bitcoin, and the Digitization of Information

Presider: Apryl A. Williams, Texas A&M University

Music Everywhere: Setting a Digital Music Trap. David Michael Arditi, University of Texas at Arlington

Building the Blockchain World: The Rise of a Technological Commonwealth from the Agonies of Capitalism. Sarah Grace Manski, UC Santa Barbara

What is Bitcoin? Adoption, Co-option, and the Robust Object of Digital Currency. Lynette Shaw, University of Michigan

Table 07. Social Networks and Social Movements

The Global Jihadist Movement and its Communicative Action Repertoire. Maxime Berube, Université de Montréal; Anthony Amicelle, Université de Montréal; Benoit Dupont, Université de Montréal

Repression and Political Participation of Iranian Pro-democracy Supporters around the 2013 Presidential Elections. Ali Honari, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam; Jeroen Voerknecht, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam; Jasper Muis, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam

Table 08. Shaping a More Just Society: The Role of Communication, Information Technologies, and Media Sociology

Presider: Johnny E. Williams, Trinity College

Building Social Legoland through Collaborative Crowdsourcing: Effect of Marginality on Collaboration and Task Outcomes. Rong Wang, Northwestern University

Decolonial Options for Cultural Techniques and Inequalities in Digital Cultural Health Literacy. Alexander I. Stingl, Leuphana University Lüneburg

Technological Tethering, Cohort Effects, and the Work-Family Interface. Andrew David Nevin, University of Toronto

Table 08. Shaping a More Just Society: The Role of Communication, Information Technologies, and Media Sociology

Presider: Johnny E. Williams, Trinity College

Building Social Legoland through Collaborative Crowdsourcing: Effect of Marginality on Collaboration and Task Outcomes. Rong Wang, Northwestern University

Decolonial Options for Cultural Techniques and Inequalities in Digital Cultural Health Literacy. Alexander I. Stingl, Leuphana University Lüneburg

Technological Tethering, Cohort Effects, and the Work-Family Interface. Andrew David Nevin, University of Toronto

Section on Communication, Information Technologies, and Media Sociology Business Meeting: Palais des congrès de Montréal, 517B, 9:30-10:10am

Section on Communication, Information Technologies, and Media Sociology. Race, Social Movements and Digital Media Technologies Palais des congrès de Montréal, 513C, 10:30am-12:10pm

Session Organizer: Jessie Daniels, Hunter College and The Graduate Center-CUNY

The Effect of #BlackLivesMatter: The Significance of Communities and Collective Identity. Simon Weffer-Elizondo, Northern Illinois University; Stephanie Delise Jones, University of California, Irvine

Hate Speech Online and the Fight for Legal Protection: The Case of Japan. Vivian Shaw, University of Texas at Austin

The Master’s Tools Reimagined: Police Militarization and Strategies of Black Digital Resistance. Caliesha Lavonne Comley, Boston College

Black Women and the Subversive Occupation of Digital Space. Leslie Jones, University of Pennsylvania

Section on Communication, Information Technologies, and Media Sociology. Culture, Inequality and Social Inclusion in the Digital Era Palais des congrès de Montréal, 513B, 2:30-4:10pm

Session Organizer: Jessie Daniels, Hunter College and The Graduate Center-CUNY

Free Speech, Representation and Inclusion on Social Media Platforms. Zeynep Tufekci, University of North Carolina

Skills Gaps, Surveillance, and Hope in Training at a High-Tech Charter School. Daniel Greene, Microsoft Research New England

The Digital Hustle: Precarious Labor of High and Low Status Workers in the “Gig” Economy. Julia B. Ticona, University of Virginia

Blood, Sweat, and Tears: Biotechnology and the Future of Wearable Tech. Elizabeth A. Wissinger, City University of New York/BMCC

The Pipeline of Online Participation Inequalities: The Case of Wikipedia Editing. Aaron Shaw, Northwestern University; Eszter Hargittai, University of Zurich

Section on Communication, Information Technologies, and Media Sociology Reception: 6:30pm

August 13th

  1. Thematic Session. How Technology is Changing Social Relationships Palais des congrès de Montréal, 511C, 8:30-10:10am

Session Organizer: Kevin Lewis, University of California, San Diego

Presider: Kevin Lewis, University of California, San Diego

Birds of a Feather Flock Together Online: Differences in Social Media Adoption. Eszter Hargittai, University of Zurich

Cellphones in Public: Social Interaction in a Smartphone Era. Lee Humphreys, Cornell University

Digitally Enabled Social Movement Participation. Jennifer Earl, University of Arizona; Katrina E. Kimport, University of California, San Francisco

The Shifting Boundaries of Urban Community. Jeffrey Lane, Rutgers University

The impact of contemporary technologies on interpersonal relationships has riveted public attention. Anxieties abound concerning smartphone-obsessed parents who neglect their children, teenagers socializing in virtual spaces, and the ever-growing importance of social media in all spheres of life, from online romance to online activism. What do we know empirically about new technology and social interactions so far, and what else lies ahead?

  1. Regular Session. Gender, Ethnicity, and Racialization in the Media Palais des congrès de Montréal, 512E, 8:30-10:10am

Session Organizer: Anabel Quan-Haase, University of Western Ontario

Lesbianing Together: Images of Incarcerated Women in Orange is the New Black. Anna Curtis, SUNY Cortland; Meghan Kocijanksi, SUNY Cortland

Using Culture to Change Culture: Exploring Online Violence Against Women Prevention Work as Bystander Intervention. Jordan Fairbairn, Western University

The Maternal Gaze: The Pleasures of Connectivity IRL and URL. Kara M. Van Cleaf, Monmouth University

Racialization of the Muslim Body and Space in Hollywood. Maheen Haider, Boston College

Mass Shootings, Medicine, and the Media: The Role of Whiteness in Violent Crime Coverage. Laura Frizzell, The Ohio State University; Sade Lindsay, The Ohio State University

Discussant: Maryann Erigha, University of Georgia

  1. Special Session. Culture(s) of Privacy and Surveillance in World of Technological and Legal Change Palais des congrès de Montréal, 515B, 12:30-2:10pm

Session Organizer: Denise L. Anthony, Dartmouth College

Presider: Denise L. Anthony, Dartmouth College

It’s Dangerous: The Online World of Drug Dealers, Rappers, and the Street Code. Marta-Marika Urbanik, University of Alberta; Kevin D. Haggerty, University of Alberta

A Socio-history of Privacy and the Self. Celeste Campos-Castillo, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Surveillance Culture and Surveillance Capitalism. David Lyon

Privacy and Protest. Jennifer Earl, University of Arizona

Soon-to-be-Author-Meets-Non-Critics. “Superconnected: The Internet, Digital Media, and Techno-Social Life.” Mary Chayko, Rutgers University Palais des congrès de Montréal, 514A, 9:00-11:00pm

August 14th

  1. Policy and Research Workshop. Engage! How to Win Over the Media, Promote Your Research and Become a Front Page Personality Palais des congrès de Montréal, 510D, 8:30-10:10am

Session Organizer: Carmen Russell, American Sociological Association

Leader: Carmen Russell, American Sociological Association

Panelists: Elizabeth Ghedi-Ehrlich, Scholars Strategy Network Emily Costello, The Conversation U.S.

Everyday, journalists are looking for expert sources on topics their audiences care about, topics sociologists are natural experts in. They want to talk to you… but are you ready to talk to them? The ASA is looking to bridge that gap and hosting a workshop/panel designed to help members improve their public engagement practices. For that purpose, we are working with The Conversation and Scholars Strategy Network and have invited them to come to Montreal to discuss how they can help sociologists promote their research to the widest possible audience. The Conversation (theconversation.com) is an independent source for informed commentary and analysis, all written by the academic and research community and edited by journalists for the general public as a way of promoting a better understanding of current affairs and complex issues among the public at large. The Scholars Strategy Network (scholarsstrategynetwork.org) seeks to improve public policy and strengthen democracy by organizing scholars working in America’s colleges and universities, connecting their research to policymakers, citizens associations, and the media. The workshop panel will provide details on how to: • Pitch and write commentary, op-eds, essays and analysis for general interest media • Promote oneself as an expert source on particular topics of interest to media and public • Engage in an interview whether for print, TV, radio, and live broadcast • Build a portfolio of “news hits” in the course of creating a public persona as a subject matter expert

  1. Section on Sociology of Culture. Gender, Culture, Media Palais des congrès de Montréal, 513C, 8:30-10:10am

Session Organizer: Andrea Press, University of Virginia

Presider: Andrea Press, University of Virginia

Incorporating the Erotic: Redrawing the Boundaries of Sexuality and New Media in Romance Genre Fiction. Anna Michelson, Northwestern University

Non-notable? Deletion as Devaluation on Wikipedia. Francesca Tripodi, University of Virginia

Reading as a Man, Reading as a Woman: Gendered Uses of Science-fiction and Fantasy. Elodie Hommel, ENS de Lyon / Centre Max Weber

Both Underrepresented and Misrepresented: Feminist Media Activism in the National Organization for Women. Christine Slaughter, Yale University

“Mother Courage”: Sociology of a Semantic Slippage. Lorenzo Sabetta, Sapienza – University of Rome

  1. Regular Session. Internet and Society: Identity, Connectivity, and Integration Palais des congrès de Montréal, 510C, 2:30-4:10pm

Session Organizer: Wenhong Chen, University of Texas at Austin

Identity Work and Emotion Management: Invisible Forms of Digital Inequality. Laura Robinson, Santa Clara University

Connected Seniors: How Connected Seniors: How Older Adults Exchange Social Support On and Offline. Barry Wellman, University of Toronto; Anabel Quan-Haase, University of Western Ontario; Guang Ying Mo, University of Toronto; Helen Hua Wang, University of Buffalo; Alice (Renwen) Zhang, Northwestern University

Connecting and Disconnecting: Social Media Adoption and School Social Integration. Hana Shepherd, Rutgers University; Jeffrey Lane, Rutgers University

The Physical-Digital Divide: Exploring the Social Gap between Digital Natives and Physical Natives. Christopher Ball, Michigan State University; Jessica Francis, Michigan State University; Kuo-Ting Huang, Michigan State University; Travis Kadylak, Michigan State University; Shelia R. Cotten, Michigan State University; RV Rikard, Michigan State University

  1. Section on Sociology of Culture. The Mediation of Cultural Conflict Palais des congrès de Montréal, 514B, 2:30-4:10pm

Session Organizer: Matthias Revers, University of Frankfurt

From the “Sioux Massacres” to the “Dakota Genocide”: Transitional (In)Justice and Collective Memory in Minnesota (1862-2012). Alejandro Baer, University of Minnesota; Joseph Eggers, University of Minnesota; Nicholas James Siguru Wahutu, University of Minnesota; Brieanna Marie Watters, University of Minnesota

Comprehending the Contentious Public Sphere in the Authoritarian Context. Haoyue Li, SUNY, Albany

What is Right and Wrong about Russia and the United States: Mapping a Moral Field. John Sonnett, University of Mississippi

How Media Ownership Matters: Political Instrumentalism by Ownership Type in Sweden, France, and the United States. Timothy Neff, New York University; Mattias Hesserus, Uppsala University

Discussant: Lisa McCormick, University of Edinburgh

  1. Regular Session. Internet and Society: The Rogue Ones Palais des congrès de Montréal, 510C, 4:30-6:10pm

Session Organizer: Wenhong Chen, University of Texas at Austin

Presider: Wenhong Chen, University of Texas at Austin

Revolution in the making? Social Media Effects across the Globe. Shelley J. Boulianne, MacEwan University

Digital Minutemen: Paul Revere Had a Horse and Conservatives Have the Internet. Jen Schradie, Institute for Advanced Study in Toulouse

Self-Control and Exposure to Online Fraud Targeting: The Role of Information Disclosure. Gustavo S. Mesch, University of Haifa

Personal Profile Settings as Cultural Frames: Facebook vs. Vkontakte. Shanyang Zhao, Temple University; Aleksandr Shchekoturov, Lobachevsky State University of Nizhni Novgorod; Svetlana Shchekoturova, Nizhny Novgorod State Technical University

Discussant: Laura Robinson, Santa Clara University

August 15th

  1. Regular Session. Social and Digital Media Palais des congrès de Montréal, 516A, 8:30-10:10am

Session Organizer: Anabel Quan-Haase, University of Western Ontario

Becoming Data: Web Analytics, Journalism, and the Emotional Dimensions of Rationalizing Technologies. Caitlin Petre, Yale University

Does Compassion Go Viral? Social Media, Caring, and the Fort McMurray Wildfire. Shelley J. Boulianne, MacEwan University; Joanne Minaker, MacEwan University

Does Longer Social Network Site Use Cause more Psychological Distress? Yangtao Huang, The University of Queensland; Mark Western, The University of Queensland

The Mortality of Citizen Journalism Sites: An Event History Analysis. Ryan P. Larson, University of Minnesota; Andrew M. Lindner, Skidmore College

Resonance and Relevance: A Revival of Media Sociology. Wenhong Chen, University of Texas at Austin

  1. Thematic Session. How Media Shape Group Boundaries

Palais des congrès de Montréal, 511D, 12:30-2:10pm

Session Organizer: Abigail C. Saguy, UCLA

Presider: Andrea Press, University of Virginia

Segmentation, Exclusion, and Opportunity in the Digital Media Landscape: ‘Quality News for Quality Audiences’, or Something More? Rodney Benson, New York University

Creating Monsters: How Media Discourse Shapes Understandings of Sexual Predators and their Victims. Rebecca Ann DiBennardo, University of California, Los Angeles

Policing the Boundaries of Representation: (Re)creating Visual Narratives About Activists in Broadcast News, 1970 – 2012. Deana Rohlinger, Florida State University

How the New Media Divide Feminists, Gay Rights Activists, and Transgender Rights Activists. Abigail C. Saguy, UCLA; Juliet Williams, University of California-Los Angeles

Discussant: David Grazian, University of Pennsylvania

This panel session speaks to how public discourse shapes material and cultural inequalities by specifically examining how the news media shape group boundaries. News media representations of social groups shape people’s understandings of themselves and of others. By drawing on a range of specific case studies, this panel will contribute to our understanding of how the news media draw symbolic boundaries around groups in ways that produce, maintain, and sometimes challenge social inequality.


Rethinking Social Movements

The 111th American Sociological Association (ASA) Annual Meeting
Seattle, August 20-23, 2016 

#ASA16

CITAMS sessions and Media Sociology Pre-Conference

annual-mtg-11th

 

Onsite Registration will be at the Washington Convention Center and available at these times:

  • Friday, August 19: 1:30-7:00pm
  • Saturday, August 20: 8:00am-6:00pm
  • Sunday, August 21: 8:00am-5:30pm
  • Monday, August 22: 8:00am-5:30pm
  • Tuesday, August 23: 8:00am-1:00pm

Interested in information, technology, and media? Of course you are.
Be sure to add CITAMS as one of your sections! 

 

CITAMS at #ASA16 in Seattle

Friday, August 19, Media Sociology Pre-Conference
Organizer: Casey Brienza
Location: University of Washington
Communications Building on the UW campus, at 4109 E Stevens Way NE, Seattle, WA. Please report to CMU 126. Directions.

9:00am-10:00am Keynote Address, Eric Anthony Grollman (University of Richmond)
Blogging for (a) Change in Academia

10:20am – 4:40pm Parallel Panel Sessions

5:00pm-6:30pm Plenary: Media and Politics in the Age of Entertainment

David Grazian (University of Pennsylvania)
Laura Grindstaff (University of California, Davis)
Sarah Sobieraj (Tufts University)
Fred Turner (Stanford University)


CITAMS Reception – Pike Place Market,
Monday, August 22, 6:30-8pm

Pike_Place_Market_Entrance.JPG

(image source)

Everyone is welcome! (no badges required)

Pike Place MarketElliot Bay Room
Directions
Free food & drinks
Catering by Madres Kitchen


Session 475: Communication, Information Technologies
Tuesday, August 23, 8:30 to 10:10am

Location: Washington State Convention Center, Room 612, Level 6
Chair: Andrea Tapia

  1. Welcome to the Perhapsicon: Qualification, Contingency and Fluidity in Surveillance Outcomes
    Gary T. Marx, M.I.T.; Keith W. Guzik, University of Colorado Denver
  2. Reading Risk: Making Sense of Predictive Technology in Medical Contexts
    Claire D’Elia Maiers, University of Virginia
  3. Disentangling Social Role, Tie Strength, and Media Multiplexity: An Analysis of Logged Mobile Data
    Jeffrey Boase, University of Toronto; Jack Jamieson, University of Toronto
  4. Transnational Family Communication as a Driver of Technology Adoption in Immigrant Families
    Carmen Gonzalez, University of Washington; Vikki S. Katz, Rutgers University
  5. A Structure of Contestation: Reddit, its Barriers, and the Gamergate Movement
    Bertan Buyukozturk; Shawn Gaulden, Florida State University; Benjamin Jared Dowd-Arrow, Florida State University

Session 510: Media Sociology
Tuesday, August 23, 10:30am to 12:10pm

Location: Washington State Convention Center, Room 613, Level 6
Chairs: David Grazian and Ron Jacobs

  1. Explaining the Demise of the “Long Form”: A Field Analysis of Journalism’s Structural Transformation
    Alexandra Marie Kowalski
  2. Imagining Unbuilding Community: The Role of Local News in Coastal Retreat
    Liz Koslov, New York University
  3. Talk Show Politics: A Comparison of Three Different Interview Types
    Laura Loeb, University of California, Los Angeles
  4. Visualizing Activism: Patterns of Representation in Broadcast News Media, 1970-2012
    Deana Rohlinger, Florida State University; Rebecca Anne Redmond, Florida State University; Haley Gentile, Florida State University; Tara Mantovani Stamm, Virginia Commonwealth University; Alexandra Olsen, University of California, Irvine
  5. Inside the Echo Chamber? The Co-evolution of Newspapers, Fox News, and Tea Party Blogging
    Patrick Rafail, Tulane University; John D. McCarthy, Pennsylvania State University

Session 547: Social Media and Sociology
Tuesday, August 23, 12:30 to 2:10pm
Location: Washington State Convention Center, Room 615, Level 6
Chair: Andrea Tapia

  1. A Global Community or a Waste of Time? Content Analyses of Facebook’s “Humans of New York”
    Elena Vesselinov, Queens College, City University of New York; Sebastian Felipe Villamizar-Santamaria
  2.  Beyond Admissibility: The Prosecutorial Affordances of Social Media Use
    Jeffrey Lane, Rutgers University, The State University of New Jersey; Fanny Ramirez, Rutgers University
  3. Capture and Share the City: Instagram and Urban Space in Amsterdam
    John D Boy, University of Amsterdam; Justus L. Uitermark, Erasmus University Rotterdam
  4. Social Media and Collective Action Participation: A Socio-psychological Investigation
    Yuan Hsiao, University of Washington

Session 579: Roundtables
Tuesday, August 23, 2:30 to 3:30pm,
Location: Washington State Convention Center, Room 608, Level 6
Chair: Nick LaLone

Table 01. Inequalities
The growing ubiquity of the digital has begun to erase the need to maintain the divide between spaces. Despite that ubiquity, unequal treatment through the specter of anonymity from the web’s early days has created new ways to deny inclusivity among groups.

  1. Digital Inequalities, Identity Work, and Emotion Management
    Laura Robinson, Santa Clara University
  2. Gender Inequality and Online Incivility
    Alison Dahl Crossley, Stanford University, Clayman Institute for Gender Research
  3. Inclusion and Identity in the Mountain Biking Community: Navigating Subcultural Identity and Recruitment in Online Spaces
    Karen McCormack, Wheaton College
  4. Military Members and Technology for Personal Communication on Deployment: Access, Use, and Preferences
    Kristin Atwood

Table 02. Movements
In 1898, Arthur Strand believed that the addition of sight to a telephone call would mean, “distance will lose its enchantment by being abolished altogether.” Now, 118 years later, we know that the problem of distance has morphed, changed to something more than simply being there during a person-to-person call. At this table, these researchers examine the impact of social media on political movements.

  1. Digital Technologies in the Sustainability of New Social Movements: Changing the Conversation through New Technology
    Ann Irene Brooks, Bournemouth University
  2. More Than a Hashtag: How Digital Activism Research Can Be More Robust
    Jen Schradie, Institute for Advanced Study in Toulouse
  3. Research Proposal: A Multilevel Analysis of Local Political Context and Network Effects on #IdleNoMore Tweet Sentiment
    Adam Colin Howe, University of British Columbia

Table 03. Literacies
What does it mean to be computer literate? Many point to youth as a literate population. It is as though growing up in a technologically super-saturated world somehow transfers the ability to navigate digital environments with ease. We know now that the concept of the so-called digital native is a misnomer but it begs the question, “how and who actually is literate given the presence and ubiquity of technology?” At this table, we find a group of scholars exploring this question from many different perspectives.

  1. Guinée New Generation: Digital Literacies and the Mediation of Youth in Urban Guinea
    Clovis Bergere, Rutgers University – Camden
  2. Older Adults Networking On and Off Digital Media: Initial Findings from the Fourth East York Study
    Barry Wellman, University of Toronto; Anabel Quan-Haase, University of Western Ontario; Kim Martin, Western University; Meghan Miller, Western University; Christian Beermann, University of Toronto
  3. Possibility of Being Active Smartphone User with Elderly in Korea : Bridging Communication Divide
    Joohyun Oh, Yonsei University
  4. Gender Differences in Accuracy of Self-assessed Digital and eHealth Literacy among Older Adults in Israel
    Esther Brainin, Ruppin Academic Center Israel

Table 04. News
Discussions of the news, or news media are important when we begin to consider their influence over public rhetoric in the age of social media. At this table, the discussion will revolve around how news has changed over time.

  1. Elite Experts versus Lay Experts in French and U.S. News Reporting on Gay Marriage Michael Stambolis-Ruhstorfer, Dickinson College (Unable to attend)
  2. Public Radio’s Ground Game: A National Assessment of Commercialism at Local NPR Affiliates
    Peter P. Nieckarz, Western Carolina University
  3. The Changing Quality of Epidemic News Reporting– Institutional Isomorphism and Professionalism
    Rebecca S.K. Li, The College of New Jersey

Table 05. Crises
Each crisis is in no small part human-created. At this table, researchers who have engaged the concept of crisis, from politically driven to naturally-driven, will be discussed.

  1. The Empathetic Gaze of Disaster News: Hurricane Katrina and the Virginia Tech Shootings
    Timothy Recuber, Princeton University
  2. The Ferguson Effect
    Joan M. Donovan, University of California Los Angeles
  3. Whose Lives Matter?: The Newsworthiness of Police Killings of Unarmed Blacks Alicia D. Simmons, Colgate University

Table 06. Personal
Technology in the age of information is focused on a particular paradigm – 1 user using 1 machine. When that paradigm was augmented by networked devices. The resulting proliferation of computerized networks and inevitable mobilization of that paradigm has created numerous, very personal effects for people, groups, and societies writ large. At this table, we see multiple attempts to understand how technologies influence people.

  1. Benefits and Harms from Internet Use: A differentiated analysis of the United Kingdom
    Grant Blank, University of Oxford; Christoph Lutz, Institute for Media and Communications Management
  2. Humor as a Form of Networked Practice in the Chinese Cyber Public Sphere
    Mathew Yates, University of Oxford; Reza Hasmath, University of Alberta
  3. Privacy Expectations and Gender Ideology: Cultural Influences on Communicating Personal Information
    Celeste Campos-Castillo, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee; stef m. shuster, Duke University; Denise L. Anthony, Dartmouth College
  4. The Gendered Dynamics of Text Messaging in the Social Networks of College Students
    Jordan Sannito, University of Notre Dame; Michael Penta, University of Notre Dame; Matthew J. Chandler, University of Notre Dame; David S. Hachen, University of Notre Dame
  5. Couplehood in the Age of the Internet
    Michael J. Rosenfeld, Stanford University (cannot attend Roundtable Session)
  6. Slide into Your DM with Heart Eyes: Teenagers Flirting on Social Media
    Dina B. Pinsky, Arcadia University

Table 07. Social Life of Information
This table shares the name of the Xerox PARC book, “The Social Life of Information.” In this book, the authors discuss the consequences of the technical sciences maintaining control of the information that they produce. While we often view time as a correlate to progress in technological terms, the truth often shows a far less favorable process. This collection of authors concerns itself with consequence in a digital age.

  1. Thank You For Signing Our Petition!: Understanding the Differences in Signatory Support
    Afife Idil Akin, State University Of New York At Stony Brook
  2. When Risk Society Meets a Transnational Networked Public Sphere: An Analysis of PM2.5 Twitter Network
    Wenhong Chen, University of Texas at Austin; Fangjing Tu, University of Wisconsin-Madison; Pei Zheng, University of Texas at Austin
  3. Digital Subscriptions: The Unending Consumption of Music in the Digital Era
    David Michael Arditi, University of Texas at Arlington
  4. Spatial Excitation: Testing a Network Activation Theory of Rumor Transmission
    Sean M. Fitzhugh, U.S. Army Research Laboratory; Carter T. Butts, University of California, Irvine
  5. Making New Online Contacts that Help You Get a Job in the Internet Age
    Uwe Matzat, Eindhoven University of Technology; Erik van Ingen, Tilburg University

Table 08. Algorithmic Culture
Here, we have gathered 4 papers representing the builders of CITAMS. From deep sight to the cloud, from the social life of metrics to mobilization, these sociologists are not only observing people use technology, but building it as well.

  1. The Social Life of Metrics: The Entanglement of Expertise and Analytics in the U.S. News Industry
    Caitlin Petre, Yale University
  2. Algorithmic Sociology and the Emergence of Deep Sight
    Thomas Crosbie, University of Maryland College Park; Jonathan Roberge, Yale
  3. Algorithmic Culture In Cloud we Trust? Dealing with Uncertainties in Platform Services
    Arvind Karunakaran, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  4. Resource Partitioning and Density Dependence on a Digital Mobilization Platform
    Nathan Tegrotenhuis; Benjamin Mako Hill, University of Washington; Aaron Shaw, Northwestern University

Table 09. Movements 2
In 1898, Arthur Strand believed that the addition of sight to a telephone call would mean, “distance will lose its enchantment by being abolished altogether.” Now, 118 years later, we know that the problem of distance has morphed, changed to something more than simply being there during a person-to-person call. At this table, these researchers examine the impact of social media on political movements.

  1. Diversifying Culture of Taiwanese Bulletin Board System Users: Post-Pushing as a Form of Guerrilla Warfare
    Chia-rong Tsao, National Chengchi University, Taiwan; Hou-ming Huang, National Chengchi University
  2. M-health and Sustainability in Ghana
    Christobel Asiedu, Louisiana Tech University
  3. The Emergence of Cross National Cosmopolitan Identity Among the Activists of the Global Occupy Movement
    Oded Marom, University of Southern California
  4. Legitimation of Grievances and the Significance of #Hashtags: Establishing Boundaries and Trending in Social Media
    Victoria Marie Gonzalez, Rutgers University
  5. Is Social Media New Public Sphere?
    Zhou Dai, University of Warwick

Business Meeting & Section Awards
Tuesday, August 23, 3:30 to 4:10pm


 

ASA 2015 Chicago

MEDIA SOCIOLOGY Preconference in Chicago: Friday August 21st

8:00-6:30 at the Northwestern University

Kellogg School of Management (Downtown Chicago Campus)

For complete schedule, see: http://asamediasociology.blogspot.co.uk/


CITASA/CITAMS in Chicago : Monday August 24th

Our section’s 10 Roundtables, Business Meeting, & 2 Panels are all scheduled in the    Palmer House Hilton from 8:30 AM to 6:10 PM.

Join us for our reception with the Children and Youth Section on Monday evening from 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. at The Gage  (24 S. Michigan Avenue, Chicago, IL 60603).

Roundtables: 8:30-9:30 AM: Palmer House Hilton, 6th Floor, Monroe Ballroom

Business Meeting: 9:30-10:10 AM: Palmer House Hilton, 6th Floor, Monroe Ballroom

Panel 1: 2:30-4:10 PM: Palmer House Hilton, 3rd Floor, Salon 12

Panel 2: 4:30-6:10 PM: Palmer House Hilton, 3rd Floor, Salon 12

Reception: 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. at The Gage  (24 S. Michigan Avenue)


Panel 1: 2:30-4:10: Palmer House Hilton, 3rd Floor, Salon 12

“Inequalities and Communication, Media, and Information Technologies.”

The first paper in the panel is “Gender and the internet, revisited” by Hiroshi Ono and Madeline Zavodny. They are followed by Anabel Quan Haase, Kim Martin, and Kathleen Schreurs who will present: “Participation in a digital world: How seniors make sense of and use ICTs.” Next up is Gustavo S. Mesch with “Race, ethnicity and the strength of Facebook ties among U.S. adolescents.” Next come Christopher Ball, Tim Kuo, Ting Huang, Shelia R. Cotten, RV Rikard, and LaToya O’Neal Coleman with “Invaluable expectations: An expectancy value theory analysis of youths’ college motivation.” In closing, Josef Ku, Hsun Ma, and Todd E. Vachon will present “Bridging the digital gap between wealthier and poorer students? A cross national analysis.”

Panel 2: 4:30-6:10: Palmer House Hilton, 3rd Floor, Salon 12

“Open Topics on Communication, Media, and/or Information.”                   

The panel opens with “Big Data and the emergence of system identities” by Aneesh Aneesh and Matthew McCarthy. Second on the panel, Deana Rohlinger presents “Strategy and social change: Why reputation matters to social movements.” The third contribution comes from Wenhong Chen, Cuihua Shen, and Gejun Huang: “The implications of coplay for generalized trust in and beyond a Chinese MMOG world.” Fourth up are Weixu Lu and Keith N. Hampton with “Beyond the power of networks: Differentiating network structure and social media for social support.”   Next, “A dynamic phenomenon: The uses and types of social network sites” will be presented by Grant Blank and Darja Groselj. The session closes with “Using topic models to study journalist audience convergence and divergence: The case of human trafficking coverage” by Maria Eirini Papadouka, Nicholas Evangelopoulos, and Gabe Ignatow.                               


 

Roundtables: 8:30-9:30 AM: Palmer House Hilton, 6th Floor, Monroe Ballroom

Round Table 1: Communication Technology and Organizations

The first round table opens with Andrea Gorbatai (Presider) and Laura K. Nelson with “The language of crowdfunding.” This is followed by Carrie B. Sanders, Silfrid Laurier, Crystal Weston, and Nicole Schott presenting “Police innovations and accountability: Empirically studying organizational change in Canadian policing.” Next is Sara Gaby who shares “Tweeting the message: How online tools shape organizational perceptions of effectiveness.” Amanda Rose Martin completes the round table with “Michigan hydraulic fracturing controversy: Evaluating stakeholders’ social marketing strategies.”

Round Table 2: Communication Technology and Social Construction

Jenny L. Davis (Presider) opens with “Curating social life.” Christopher Quiroz follows with “Communicating with the techno-generalized other: The risk of the micro-self through restricted internet-based interactions.” Third up is Timothy Recuber presenting “Self-destruction as a self-preservation: Digital suicide notes and the commemoration of the self.” Elke Wagner, Johannes Gutenburg, Martin Stempfhuber, and Niklas Barth close the round table with “The intimacy of strange friends: On public and private communication on social network sites.”

Round Table 3: Culture: Collective Meaning

Susan Sprecher (Presider), Diane H. Felmlee, Adam Hampton, and Hannah Jones begin with “Can I connect with both you and my social network? Get-acquainted interactions and communication technology.” Mary Chayko presents “Portable Community: Creating Collective Meaning in Digital Environments”. Xiaoli Tian concludes the round table with “Network domains in social networking sites: Offline life and online activities.

Round Table 4: Media Sociology and Culture

Elizabeth A. Wissinger (Presider) opens with “Fashion models’ glamour labor and the mediation of affect.” Next, Cassidy Puckett presents “How culture structures opportunity: Adolescents’ approach to technology learning and social stratification.” In closing, Iva Petkova shares “Revisiting material practices of symbolic distinction: Online fashion organizations as mediators of legitimacy in fashion.”

Round Table 5: Media, Culture, and Identity

David A. Martin (Presider) presents “User ID (entity): Examining the role of online interaction in racial identity formation, “followed by Change Zhe Lin’ with “A new digital divide: Social context and the selective value of internet use in American neighbourhoods.” Next is Trenton James Lee with “The boyfriend tag: An exploration of YouTube participatory culture and gender, sexual, and relationship ideologies.” Yu-Ying Hu closes with “Queer girls in the digital world: Technologized connectivity, cultural transnationalization and lesbian youth identity.”

Round Table 6: Media Sociology and Issues of Access

Michael Haight (Presider), Anabel Quan-Haase, and Andrew Nevin open with “Barriers to internet access: Digital inequality as experienced by residents of low-income housing.” Matthew Manierre continues with “Gaps in knowledge: Tracking and explaining gender differences in health information seeking.” Concluding the round table is Alexander I. Stingl with “Digital cultural health care capital.”

Round Table 7: Media Sociology and Social Movements I

Joan M. Donovan (Presider) begins with “Can you hear me now? Phreaking the party line from operators to occupy.” Next up are Austin Choi-Fitzpatrick, Tautvydas Juskauskas, and Mohammad Sabur with “All the protestors fit to count: Using unmanned aerial vehicles to estimate protest crowd size.” Joseph DiGrazia follows with “Google search as a measure of economic and ethnic threat in predicting right-wing mobilization.” Fangzhau Ding concludes with “Screen activist in the Hong Kong umbrella movement.”

Round Table 8: Media Sociology and Social Movements II

First is Selen Yanmas (Presider) with “Gezi as a contemporary social movement: Affective resistance and transformation of collective action through ICTS.” Next, Sun Hyoung Lee presents “Critical mass of online space and blogs for social change.” In closing, Afife Idil Akin shares ”Online social movement action: The case of petition signing.”

Round Table 9: Structure of Communication Technology

Casey Brienza (Presider) opens with “Publishing between profit and public value: Academic books and open access policies.” Daniel Guangnin follows with “Free and open source communities between hedonism and advocacy: Renegotiating the distinction between experts and lays.” Next, Monica M. Brannon shares “This is not a picture: Satellite imagery and technovisual authority.” Fan Mai continues with “Glocalization: American expatriates reconstruct media environment in China.”Guang Ying Mo concludes with “Does diversity create innovation?”

Round Table 10: International Perspectives

Barry Wellman (Presider) and Vincent Chua open Round Table 10 with “Social Networks and Asian Values: Findings and Speculations.” Next, Asha Rathina Pandi speaks on ”Social movements and new media in Malaysia,” followed by Matthew Pearce who shares “Democratic influence of internet participation.” Finally, Apryl Williams presents: “Exploring Culture and iCTS in the Democratic Republic of Congo.”


ASA 2014 San Francisco

Saturday:

CITASA Reception 6:30-8:30

Sunday:

CITASA Open Topic on Communication and Information Technologies 8:30-10:10

CITASA Roundtables 10:30-11:30

CITASA Business meeting 11:30-12:10

CITASA Invited Session on the History and Future of CITASA 12:30-2:10


ASA 2013 NYC

CITASA Activities at ASA 2013 | New York, NY


Friday:

4:30-7:00 PreASA ICT Marketing Panel

Saturday:

8:30 Social Construction of Technology

10:30 Open Topic on Communication, Technology and Society

2:30 Who’s Lonely Now? Examining the Impacts of Technology Use on Social Connections and  Relationships

2:30 Open Roundtables Table 26. Culture and Communication

4:30 CITASA Roundtable:

4:30 Medical Sociology Roundtable: Technology and Health

5:30 CITASA Business Meeting

6:30 Reception

Sunday: 

8:30 Social Media and Social Inequalities

8:30 Sociology of Culture Roundtable: Producing Film

10:30 Section on Methodology Paper Session: Methods For Networks and Big Data

10:30 Collective Behavior: Media and Mobilization

10:30 Teaching and Learning Sociology with Technology

12:30 Digital Youth: Young People, New Media and Social Change

2:30 Knowledge Tools

Monday:

2:30 Internet and Society 1

4:30 Internet and Society 2

4:30 Political Sociology Roundtable: Politics, Journalism, and the Media

Tuesday:

8:30 Media Sociology

8:30 Orgs, Occs, and Work: Innovation and Diffusion

10:30 Media Sociology 2

 

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